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Lower left abdominal pain? – Diverticulitis Symptoms Checker

 

Diverticulitis results from the swelling of small pouches in the large intestine in people with diverticular disease. Acute diverticulitis is the most frequent diagnosis concerning the gastrointestinal tract in the ER and outpatient clinics.

Diverticulitis exists due to a previous diverticular disease. Diverticular disease refers to the appearance of small pouches in the colon (large intestine) wall. The pouches exist due to weakness in the colon’s muscular layer; therefore, the colon’s inner layer slides through the weakness and constitutes the abnormal pouch.

These pouches can appear anywhere in the colon. The latter goes from the lower right abdomen (ascending colon), maintaining on the right side all the way up, reaching the chest. Then, just below the chest, it travels to the abdomen’s left side (transversal colon), descending through the left side till it gets where it most frequently appears, the descending colon in the lower-left portion of the abdomen.

Diverticulitis arises when one of these abnormal colon pouches infects or swells. So, diverticular disease or diverticulosis means that these pouches exist in somebody’s colon without any particular symptom. And only when they get infected or inflamed is when diverticulitis (and also the symptoms) appear. The symptoms can appear acutely or chronically; it generally affects older adults, although one of every five cases occurs in people below fifty years.

The diverticular disease appears in people as they age, affecting up to 60% of the population in their sixties. From every ten people with the diverticular disease that is very common; approximately one develop diverticulitis. Besides, from every five patients that develop one episode of diverticulitis’ symptoms, one will have one or more repetitive incidents within ten years.

Several complications could exist due to diverticulitis, and some of them are even life-threatening. Certain people are keener to develop these complications, overall with a weak immune system, such as people with HIV, organ transplant recipient, long-term steroid-using, etc. Complications include abscess, intestinal perforation or obstruction, peritonitis, sepsis, and stricture disease.

The tool is a Diverticulitis Symptoms Checker. It gathers the most important signs, symptoms, and risk factors for this condition.

For diagnosing this condition, doctors utilize blood and imaging exams in order to discard other similar diseases and confirm diverticulitis. Regarding treatment, diverticulitis has different ways of management; it can vary from a special diet and oral pills in your home to hospitalization or even surgery. It all depends on the disease’s severity, although successful results are usual outcomes with adequate management.

Remember that this tool does not replace a doctor’s assessment or the necessary blood and imaging exam for diagnosing diverticulitis. Still, the tool has questions that aim to identify the most important signs, symptoms, and risk factors for this condition. Therefore, this tool will tell anybody who uses it the likelihood of their symptoms because of diverticulitis. Using it is free and would only take a few minutes.

  • Question of

    Do you have fifty years or more?

    • Yes
    • No
  • Question of

    Do you have obesity? (please search in google the “BMI formula,” and with your weight and height it will calculate you that diagnosis)

    • Yes
    • No
  • Question of

    Do you eat fruit or vegetables every day?

    • Yes
    • No
  • Question of

    Do you drink at least one and a half-liter (1500cc) of water every day?

    • Yes
    • No
  • Question of

    Do you exercise thirty minutes a day at least five times per week? (At least a brisk-pace walk)

    • Yes
    • No
  • Question of

    Do you take every day steroids or opioids? Or do you take at least twice a week NSAIDs (aspirin, ibuprofen, naproxen, diclofenac, etc.)?

    • Yes
    • No
  • Question of

    Do you smoke cigarettes every day? (Only click yes if you smoke more than fifteen cigarettes a day)

    • Yes
    • No
  • Question of

    Do you have a sibling diagnosed with diverticular disease?

    • Yes
    • No
  • Question of

    Do you have less than three bowel movements a week? (You can also click yes if you are having bowel movements less frequently than you used to have them)

    • Yes
    • No
  • Question of

    After your bowel movement, are your stools narrow and hard?

    • Yes
    • No
  • Question of

    Do you have belly or abdominal pain? (Click yes if it has less than one week and more than twenty-four hours)

    • Yes
    • No
  • Question of

    Is this pain in the left lower portion of your abdomen? (Click yes if it has less than one week and more than twenty-four hours)

    • Yes
    • No
  • Question of

    Is this abdominal pain crampy? (Click yes if it has less than one week and more than twenty-four hours)

    • Yes
    • No
  • Question of

    Does this abdominal pain get worse when you move?

    • Yes
    • No
  • Question of

    Does this abdominal pain stay all the time? (Click yes if it does not go away)

    • Yes
    • No
  • Question of

    Do you have nausea (feeling like throwing up)?

    • Yes
    • No
  • Question of

    Are you vomiting?

    • Yes
    • No
  • Question of

    Do you have a fever? (preferably use a thermometer which needs to shows more than 101,3 °F or touch your forehead and determine if the temperature is increased)

    • Yes
    • No
  • Question of

    Do you have flatulence (too many gases)?

    • Yes
    • No
  • Question of

    Are you incapable of passing gases?

    • Yes
    • No
  • Question of

    Do you have abdominal bloating?

    • Yes
    • No
  • Question of

    Did you lose appetite?

    • Yes
    • No
  • Question of

    Do you feel a tender mass in your lower left abdomen portion?

    • Yes
    • No
  • Question of

    Have you had similar symptoms in the past years to the ones you are having right now, such as left lower abdominal pain, nausea, and hard/narrow stools? (If a doctor at that moment told you that it was due to a different cause than diverticulitis, click no)

    • Yes
    • No

Written by Dr. Esteban Kosak

Doctor of Medicine - MD Recently Graduated from Medical School and inspired to aid the global population during this situation. I think that we shall no longer be waiting to see a doctor when we feel sick. Several times we feel disease searches in Google drive us to a rabbit hole and come out thinking that we may die of cancer or something very serious, given that symptoms may seem to fit a wide variety of illnesses. Since I recently graduated from medical school. I have all the medical information fresh in my mind. My thorough experience as an expert researcher allows me to very-well known the different diseases and conditions that affect human bodies. Empowered by the United Nations 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SGDs). I think that we all can provide a grain of sand to help humanity. That's why we created Symptoms.Care a place where you can come and screen your symptoms and find what different illnesses can be related to them. Armed with the right information you can instantly, discretely, secure and from the comfort of your home talk with a Doctor that can Evaluate your Symptoms and help you seek the right treatment.

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