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Facial pain? – Trigeminal Neuralgia Symptoms Checker

 

Trigeminal neuralgia is not a so uncommon cause of pain in the face. Sadly, people are not aware that this disease actually exists.

The trigeminal nerve is the fifth and the largest cranial nerve. Its origin is in a structure of the CNS called the pons. Then, it divides into two nerve roots: a motor root and a sensory root. These roots form the Gasserian ganglion. From here, the trigeminal nerve divides into three roots: ophthalmic (V1), maxillary (V2), and mandibular (V3). Trigeminal neuralgia is a chronic condition that affects the trigeminal nerve.

There is not an exact reason why trigeminal neuralgia occurs. However, doctors think it’s mostly because of compression or direct damage to the nerve. Vascular compression of the nerve can result in trigeminal neuralgia. Also, the loss of myelin can alter the conduction of nerve signals and cause neuralgia. It’s important to note that in almost 85% of patients, the trigeminal nerve has no structural damage.

Since the cause for trigeminal neuralgia is not known yet, it is hard to identify risk factors. However, doctors have found that patients with trigeminal neuralgia have some things in common. The most important are age (around 60 years old), females, people who have multiple sclerosis, and stress.

The most important symptom of trigeminal neuralgia is face pain. But this pain has very specific characteristics. The pain only affects one side of the face, and patients describe it as stabbing and intense pain. Also, the pain attacks start suddenly, but more commonly after triggering activities. Some of the most common triggers are: chewing, talking, putting on makeup, and shaving. Basically, any activity that involves touching your face can act as a trigger.

The following tool is a trigeminal neuralgia symptom checker. It takes into account the most important signs, symptoms, and risk factors for this condition.

The diagnosis of trigeminal neuralgia can be tricky sometimes because many conditions cause facial pain. However, a trained doctor can make a diagnosis with only an interrogatory and physical examination. This is why it is important to get medical help if you suspect you suffer from this condition. Also, imaging studies like MRIs are useful in identifying a potential vascular compression of the trigeminal nerve.

Luckily, nowadays, there are many options for trigeminal neuralgia treatment. Depending on the case, the doctor will recommend one option or the other. A medical professional must choose the treatment that is best for you. The treatment has a medical approach with antiepileptic drugs like carbamazepine and a surgical approach.

This tool gathers questions that aim to find the most important symptoms, signs, and risk factors for trigeminal neuralgia. Still, remember, this tool doesn’t substitute a doctor’s knowledge to state a diagnosis. The only way to diagnose a disease is by getting a medical assessment and the imaging studies needed. Remember, many diseases cause similar symptoms. This tool will only tell you how likely you are to have this condition.

Please use this tool to see your chances of having trigeminal neuralgia. It’s completely free and won’t take you more than a couple of minutes to answer.

  • Question of

    Do you have less than forty years?

    • Yes
    • No
  • Question of

    Do you have between 60 and 70 years?

    • Yes
    • No
  • Question of

    Are you a female?

    • Yes
    • No
  • Question of

    Have you been diagnosed with multiple sclerosis?

    • Yes
    • No
  • Question of

    Do you have a stabbing/crushing pain in just one side of your face that is triggered by chewing or similar activities or by touching affected areas on the face?

    • Yes
    • No
  • Question of

    Is the pain in the right side of your face?

    • Yes
    • No
  • Question of

    Have you been experiencing the past weeks or months severe face pain or toothache lasting for hours, triggered by moving the jaw or drinking fluids?

    • Yes
    • No
  • Question of

    Does this face pain shoot from the corner of the mouth to the angle of the jaw? Or, do you experience shocks of pain from the upper lip to the eye and eyebrow, sparing the eye cavity itself?

    • Yes
    • No
  • Question of

    Does the pain initiates with a sensation of electrical shocks, then quickly change in less than 30 seconds to an intolerable discomfort felt deep in the face? Additionally, the pain then begins to fade within seconds, only to give way to a burning ache lasting seconds to minutes?

    • Yes
    • No
  • Question of

    During face pain attacks, do you grimace, wince, or make a particular head movement?

    • Yes
    • No
  • Question of

    Does the face pain present in bouts? (Typically, they appear and then disappears completely, and can be from one to tens of attacks within a day)

    • Yes
    • No
  • Question of

    Does the pain in the face is present throughout the whole day?

    • Yes
    • No
  • Question of

    Does chewing, talking, smiling, or drinking cold or hot fluids may initiate face pain? Or, touching, shaving, brushing teeth, blowing the nose, or encountering cold air from an open automobile window may also evoke face pain?

    • Yes
    • No
  • Question of

    Do you have this face pain while you are sleeping?

    • Yes
    • No

Written by Dr. Esteban Kosak

Doctor of Medicine - MD Recently Graduated from Medical School and inspired to aid the global population during this situation. I think that we shall no longer be waiting to see a doctor when we feel sick. Several times we feel disease searches in Google drive us to a rabbit hole and come out thinking that we may die of cancer or something very serious, given that symptoms may seem to fit a wide variety of illnesses. Since I recently graduated from medical school. I have all the medical information fresh in my mind. My thorough experience as an expert researcher allows me to very-well known the different diseases and conditions that affect human bodies. Empowered by the United Nations 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SGDs). I think that we all can provide a grain of sand to help humanity. That's why we created Symptoms.Care a place where you can come and screen your symptoms and find what different illnesses can be related to them. Armed with the right information you can instantly, discretely, secure and from the comfort of your home talk with a Doctor that can Evaluate your Symptoms and help you seek the right treatment.

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